Vertical Archaeology Blog

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Vertical Archaeology in Alpinist Magazine

Vertical Archaeology contributed to the “Tool User” feature in Alpinist #54. We dug into our archives and pulled out two beautiful vintage European Fifi hooks from the 1930s. The article tells the story of a close...

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Omega-Pacific Link Cam #2 Prototype

Produced in 2004, this #2 Link Cam is a prototype of the currently available units. Sizes 1 and 2 were released in 2005 and size .5 and .75 were released in 2008. Omega Pacific has developed...

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Edelrid Rope – 1979

New-Old-Stock (NOS) Edelrid Perlon Bergseil climbing rope. Offered in a standard size available at the time, 11 millimeter X 45 meter, this rope was heavy but an excellent choice for walls or traditional rock climbing. We have...

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Simond Chacal Ice Tool

Produced by Simond from 1975 until the late 1980s, this axe featured one of the first “reverse curve” commercially available. There had been steep drop picks (Peck/MacInnes Terrodactly) and modular tools (Forrest Modular System,...

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MacInnes-Peck Terrordactyl

From the 1971 Alpine Club Journal: “MacInnes-Peck ice tools New ice-axes and Terrordactyls A new all-metal ice-axe has been developed by Hamish MacInnes which uses the same well tried Hiduminium shaft of the earlier...

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Leeper Anti-piton

Ed Leeper designed the “Anti-Piton” by reimagining his very effective Z piton and reversing the taper. They came in two sizes. The idea was to stack the Anti-Piton roughly perpendicular to another piton or chock....

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Rawl Hand Drills

Rawl hand drills were great tools for placing bolt and rivets in all types of rock. Shown in our photos are the #14 and #20 drill holders. These two sizes were often used by rock...

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River Tower Rivet

This  1/4 inch rivet pulled under a body weight load when I climbed the initial pitch of the Wyrick/Merrill route on the north side of the River Tower in The Fisher Towers of Utah. Climbing this route...

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Pika Mountaineering Nutbuster

This first generation Pika Mountaineering Nutbuster is an interesting tool. It is perfect for tapping out stubborn chocks, testing the occasional fixed piton, and tightening loose bolts. The earliest versions of the Nutbuster had...